HANNAH AND HER SISTERS (1986)

This family comedy/drama centering around two Thanksgiving dinners is thought of by many critics as Woody Allen’s best film, though as a collaboration between Allen and his then-wife Mia Farrow there are some major elephants in the room.

ACE IN THE HOLE (1951)

An ultra-cynical satire of the news media and America in general, this is a movie that very much feels like it could have come out in 2021.

MIRROR (1975)

Andrei Tarkovsky’s non-linear exploration of his own family and childhood is full of unforgettable images that work better if you sort of let them wash over you instead of trying to make sense of a plot or whatever.

SCARFACE (1932)

Perhaps the prototypical gangster movie, it was hounded by the censorship office because they thought it made crime look too glamorous.

THE HOUSE IS BLACK (1962)

A 22-minute short film directed by a poet about a leper colony in Iran, which is somehow one of those works of art that might mean basically anything or everything.

THE DUNWICH HORROR (1970)

After the passing this week of the great Dean Stockwell, we revisit his very weird performance in a Roger Corman HP Lovecraft adaptation because… I felt like it.

HENRY V (1989)

The debut film for actor/director Kenneth Branagh, whose new, autobiographical movie “Belfast” is in theaters this weekend, ushered in a new era of Shakespeare on screen.

KILLER OF SHEEP (1978)

When all of your time and energy is devoted just to staying alive, what is the point of any of this? This rediscovered classic doesn’t have answers but wants to show you people asking the same questions.

NOTORIOUS (1946)

Alfred Hitchcock takes some very standard materials and somehow makes an amazing movie out of them… a great performance by Ingrid Bergman at the center helps, too.

DUNE (1984)

The first film version of Frank Herbert’s best-selling sci-fi novel was directed by David Lynch, of all people, and I found it both extremely watchable and an astounding disaster.