WEST SIDE STORY (1961)

About three-quarters of my favorite movie all-time, but not quite. Still sort of elemental to where musicals have gone since then.

ONE HUNDRED AND ONE DALMATIANS (1961)

The cute dog movie that saved Disney animation is this weekend the inspiration for a sympathetic origin story about its villainous puppy murderer.

BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID (1969)

This extremely affable western about a couple of outlaws on the run feels like the direct ancestor of your average Marvel movie.

THE LEARNING TREE (1969)

The first ever studio movie from a Black director tells the semi-autobiographical story of its director growing up in 1920s Kansas, and I was actually pretty impressed with it as a movie.

TOM JONES (1963)

A movie set in the 1700s, released in the early 1960s, that still feels startlingly modern today. I absolutely loved it. Why did no one tell me this movie was so good? He said about the Oscar winner.

CLÉO DE 5 À 7 (1962)

The earliest big international hit of the great Agnés Varda follows a female singer on a nearly-real-time journey through the Left Bank of Paris as she waits on the results of a cancer test, but it’s actually about a lot of other things.

THE PARTY (1968)

I get why some people probably love this virtuoso exhibition of physical comedy by Peter Sellers, but not only is it super racist, I think it should be re-titled “Social Anxiety: The Movie.”

EASY RIDER (1969)

Bikers, the open road, freedom, so many drugs. Who needs any story whatsoever? Well…

THE CONNECTION (1961)

This is sort of the closest thing you’ll find a movie by and for the Beat Movement, an interesting exercise but I’m not sure it actually works as a film.

BELLE DE JOUR (1967)

Luis Buñuel deftly portrays the inner sexual fantasy life of a beautiful Parisian woman in a way that the movies really hadn’t before.