OLYMPIA (1938)

Considered the first great film made about the Olympics, it is also, unfortunately, a highly effective piece of Nazi propaganda.

SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)

It is the original full-length animated movie, and helped to launch a media empire. For me it holds up today, um, intermittently?

MODERN TIMES (1936)

The final appearance of Charlie Chaplin’s Tramp character somehow remains both funny and relevant.

THE LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA (1937)

A very old-fashioned biopic (sort of) about a French writer and his fight to save an army officer wrongly accused of treason. I found myself drawn in despite myself.

WUTHERING HEIGHTS (1939)

The most Hollywood version of Emily Brontë’s weird, gothic masterpiece, which is still pretty weird and gothic if that’s what you’re into.

FREAKS (1932)

Is it a horror movie or “one of the most compassionate movies ever made?” Or somehow both? A career-destroying flop that has gradually become director Tod Browning’s most acclaimed film.

MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY (1935)

I spent most of this classic Best Picture winner checking to see how much time it had left. You may like it more if you are more into shirtless Clark Gable than I am.

THE WIZARD OF OZ (1939)

Estimated to be the most-watched movie of all-time, it somehow works just as well 82 years later.

ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT (1930)

Perhaps the ultimate anti-War movie, its battle scenes represented a quantum leap for movies. Some of the smaller things may not hold up, but the message does.